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Edith Crawley's decision to take back her daughter after months in adoptive parents care.

  • I find this proposed action, in one short scene near the end of season 4, to be more than off-putting. The daughter has now been in the care of a Swiss couple for several months; what are we to think of their feelings? Of course it's Edith's child, but are we to believe that it was really like that in the England of the 20's - that people of high peerage could play with people's lives by merely setting down a secret plan in the Downton Abbey tea room? Or, is Edith's delicate condition advancing to serious levels of affliction? I certainly hope, if the child's 'retrieval' goes forward, that next season begins with some modicum of a storyline on how it all took place, rather than just having the child back in England with no further explanation. Mr. Fellowes owes us that at least.

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    • i think edith made a stupid choice

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    • 2/26/14 1:04p Downton Edith and the Baby wiki contributor: 98.229.201.96 The writer Julian Fellowes is the culprit for leaving out DETAILS, he has done this for FOUR seasons. He only gives out Tidbits. As for Edith, I'm not happy with the way things have turned out for her but very pleased SHE did something, anything to change from her moany, whiney demeanor. Edith, was gone for 8 months, she nursed the baby and bonded with the child, she had few options and all were bad. I don't know anything about the Swiss couple and that fact this has happened many times, Children have been taken away from real 'Biological' parents, adoptive and foster parents. The current film "Philomena" her child was forcibly taken away from her. Why shouldn't Edith take her child back, I'm glad. Just don't expect any details.

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    • I gave up a granddaughter in 1983. It was tough, but my daughter felt she could not give her the things she would need. Like a 'good reputation'. As it turns out, she is now wealthy with a healthy backup from her adopted family. I had a close family member that shared she was 'a bastard' and the agony of her childhood in the 1940's. I don't know where Mr. Fellowes head was when he decided to allow this poor child to come back to Downton. If it were a 'true' story, she would suffer much more than Edith could imagine. I also disliked every other scene being some woman crying during the entire last episode

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    • In addition to the dreary writing for Edith's mournful character, I think this season in general was not up to the standard of the first 3.

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    • 3/01/14 10:48p Downton Edith/The Baby A Wiki contributor: 98.17.168.236 In 1922-23, a family such as the Crawley's, had a lot more choices than most families would have had but Edith has had very few people to confide in, that is truly the most damning part of the story. I really despise the moral superiority during that time and throughout history, that a child is labeled a BASTARD because there was no formal Marriage between the parents of the child. The mother is labeled "an Unwed Mother" a typical epithet and so much worse and they also say the child has "No Father." Ridiculous! Without the 'Father' there wouldn't be any child. Many, many children were given up to the Orphanages, Foster care system, it didn't turn out so well and the children were treated as less than Human because they were Orphans. I say this because people have made choices, such as your own situation, you made a choice and you lived with that decision. Do you really believe that Edith hasn't suffered enough already? Does Edith have to suffer forever, because society says that she should? Edith is giving the baby to Timothy Drewe, is the baby now more acceptable to society? Damn the society moral police! When a woman gives birth and SHE decides to keep that child and raise it, it is her decision, no one else's.

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    • Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe the only chance Edith's daughter has, if it is one, of being accepted by society and her illegitimacy being overlooked (at least by some) would be if her father returns, marries her mother, acknowledges his daughter and takes responsibility for her. So he better return; I'm certain he would acknowledge his child unlike Major Bryant in season 2. I'm glad Edith is once again not letting herself be crushed under, though I wish she had taken a more active role in looking for Michael.

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    • 3/2/14 7:09p Downton Edith/Baby/Gregson A Wikia contributor: 96.244.60.50 This series being fictional, I decided that I'll create my own version of the series. I want to go against the conventions of the period, I want to fight the pompous ass snobs that try to dictate how we live our lives. I support Edith in her efforts to secure her child and she knows the risks but Timothy Drewe is one of the few good people she can trust. Edith left it to others to find Gregson, in hindsight she needed a Muscled-Crew to go with her to Germany, to search for Michael Gregson. It was very DANGEROUS in Germany at this time and it would become worse as time passed, so Edith needed a lot of help in the search for Michael Gregson. His Newspaper company found out some unsettling facts about his disappearance and to think Nazi control was only 10 short years away.

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    • I just find it selfish of Edith to pawn Marigold of on the Drewes. How could she think she could just waltz into their home whenever she wants to see her. I don't think she is very stable because of that.

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    • I'm sad to see so much Edith hate in this thread. Try to put yourself into her situation. She was a lady from an aristocratic family in the 1920s, who happened to become pregnant out of wedlock (because the man she loved couldn't divorce his wife, who did not even recognize him anymore). What exactly do you think that Edith should have done with her daughter, when she painfully realized that she couldn't go through an abortion? Giving the girl up for adoption and most likely never see her again could have been an option, except that Edith wanted to keep her daughter in her custody. Neither the Swiss couple (whom we didn't even get to know at all) or the Drewes were Marigold's legal parents at any point. They were only temporary care-takers, who took on the task to look after the girl until her father turned up (except he never did). It was unfortunate that Mrs Drewe never understood that, but it wasn't Edith's fault that Mr Drewe didn't explain things to his wife.

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    • having a child out of wedlock was one of the most dangerous situations to any woman in that period, aristocratic, middle class or working class (as Ethel in the show). Inmediatily the woman and child would be haunted for life, for that reason Mary´s actios were so bad, because she not only put in danger her sister, also her niece and by extension she and the rest of the family. Anyway, the problem with the story is that JF always went for the "easy" story with a lot of melodrama, he could have managed that Edith have the child in switzerland, came back with her, and made a story about how she adopted the child from a poor family. It wasnt a strange that a rich spinter (Edith was rich by any standars of that time) and raise her like her daughter; with that story they could show us how Edith finally managed to be fully independent, as many war widows or spinters (because of the lack of men by the war, nearly 1 million died and the higgest proportion in the upper classes) that craved their own life besides marriage. The most important thing was keeping the secret. For the same reason it was totally stupid when Cora practically threated Edith about talking about Marigold in front of the employees of the magazine.... 

      Another thing, it was ludicrous that a a woman like Mrs Drewes would be so displeased because someone like Edith showed interest in one of her childs, we are talking britain before the welfare state, when kids of that sort of family luckily would have some basic clothes, with luck buy 1 pair of shoes in the year. Any woman of her origings would have being doing cartwheels because a rich person is helping one their sons, it means money for education, clothes, contacts for the future, etc. I even laugh, when Mrs Drewe said that she was taking the rest of the kids to the dentist, ludicrous, in those times the dentist was only for rich people and middle class, dentist was a luxury for working class people, in the same level that going regularly to the doctor, books for the school, etc. Even Molesley, as many childs of the same background, admited that he was in school until he was 12 because then he had to work to help the family. Even if Mrs Drewes would think that Edith is extremely annoying, she would keep her mouth shut and receive that important help.

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    • It was a mess.

      Edith was making it up as she went along, almost entirely on her own, never knowing if Gregson would walk through the door in the next minute and take care of everything. 

      Tim Drewe was a goodhearted man who sincerely wanted to help and thought his wife would fall in with his plan. He never thought she would form such an attachment to a stranger's child.

      Margie Drewe probably entered into the arrangement with the same thought, and then  . . . She had two sons, but this was a little girl.

      And then they did what they had to do. When Edith was threatened with losing her daughter, she took her away and ran off  to London. When Margie's sanity was threatened by the close presence of Marigold, Tim decided to find another farm--that, I believe, even more than Robert's earnest wish for them to go, was the main reason he took his family away.

      Good people, good intentions, but they don't always work out.

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    • Tim Drewe did admit he and Edith both forgot about emotion when he agreed to her plan to have Marigold grow up nearby. Sometimes I wonder what might have happened had Edith brought in Mrs. Drewe in on the plant from the start along with her husband, but then again she was trying to keep everything under wraps as much as possible; she wasn't going to trust her family after her aunt and grandmother's attempts to keep Marigold away. And yes I think she was always hoping Michael would return alive and free to marry her.

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    • 200.28.29.60 wrote:
      Inmediatily the woman and child would be haunted for life, for that reason Mary´s actios were so bad, because she not only put in danger her sister, also her niece and by extension she and the rest of the family.

      I'm surprised none of the family brought up this possibility, or explained why Edith wanted Mary to be left out of the secret more than anyone, or even the Pamuk affair (as Mary could have possibly been in a similar situation had her luck been different).

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    • 200.28.29.60 wrote:
      having a child out of wedlock was one of the most dangerous situations to any woman in that period, aristocratic, middle class or working class (as Ethel in the show). 

      True, Ethel's story gave us a glimpse into what the same situation would have been like for a working class girl. But her situation was still not exactly the same as Edith's. It is heart-breaking to see that as long as Ethel kept Charlie, she could never find any job other than as a prostitute.  But she did have an option, that I don't think that most women in her situation did: she could give Charlie up to his wealthy grandparents and find a new job. And that is also what she did in the end, even if she made sure that her new job was close to Charlie's new home.  

      Edith had to think about not only her own reputation, but that of her family as well. She had more resources that Ethel, but there was also less room for a scandal in her life. A working class girl could just move somewhere else and start anew, but it wasn't that simple for an earl's daughter.   

      I even laugh, when Mrs Drewe said that she was taking the rest of the kids to the dentist, ludicrous, in those times the dentist was only for rich people and middle class, dentist was a luxury for working class people.

      Indeed. My mother was a kid in the 1950s, so it was a generation after the 1920s. And still, she only brushed her teeth once a year. Which was right before her yearly trip to the dentist. She did not have her own tooth brush either. Nope, she had to share one with her parents. And there was no tooth paste either. They had to use salt! Needless to say, all my grand- parents had false teeth. And both my parents also had bad dental health until they were adults and starting brushing their teeth every day.

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