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List of minor off screen characters/Authors, Composers, Actors and Entertainers

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DanteEdit

Durante degli Alighieri simply referred to as Dante (c. 1265–1321), was a major Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, originally called La Comedia and later called Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature.[1]

Appearances

Matthew: "This is like the outer circle of Dante's Inferno"
Rosamund: "The outer circle?"
— Episode 3.08
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Theda BaraEdit

Real name Theodosia Goodman. Also from Cincinnati, Cora's home town.

Theda Bara (July 29, 1885 – April 7, 1955) was an American silent film and stage actress.

Bara was one of the most popular actresses of the silent era, and one of cinema's earliest sex symbols. Her femme fatale roles earned her the nickname The Vamp (short for vampire). Bara made more than 40 films between 1914 and 1926, but most are now lost due to a fire that destroyed the majority of her films in 1937. After her marriage to Charles Brabin in 1921, she made two more feature films and retired from acting in 1926 having never appeared in a sound film. She died of stomach cancer at the age of 69.[2]

Appearances

Carson: "Oh, you should see some of the gadgets in the kitchens. And the bathrooms, oh, goodness me. They're like something out of a film with Theda Bara."
Hughes: "I'm surprised you know who Theda Bara is."
Carson: "Oh, I get about, Mrs Hughes. I get about. "
— Episode 2.07
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John BarrymoreEdit

John Sidney Blyth (February 14 or 15, 1882 – May 29, 1942), known as John Barrymore and Jack Barrymore, was an American actor of stage, screen and radio. He first gained attention as a handsome stage actor in light comedy, then high drama and culminating in his portrayals in Shakespearean plays Hamlet and Richard III. His success continued with motion pictures in various genres in both the silent and sound eras. Barrymore's personal life has been the subject of much writing before and since his death in 1942. The most prominent member of a theatrical dynasty, he was the brother of Lionel and Ethel Barrymore.[3]

Appearances
Mary: "I know, and I wish you much happiness Tony. I really do."
Mabel Lane Fox: "I don't want to hurry anyone, but can we bring this to an end? I've had quite enough sentiment from John Barrymore, and I'm starving."
Tony: "Goodbye Mary, and good luck to you."
Episode 5.07
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BartokEdit

Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer and pianist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Liszt are regarded as Hungary's greatest composers. Through his collection and analytical study of folk music, he was one of the founders of comparative musicology, which later became ethnomusicology.[4]

Appearances

Violet: "What a relief, I thought we might have been in for some of that awful German lieder. You can always rely on Puccini."
Isobel: "I prefer Bartok."
Violet: "You would."
Episode 4.03
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Clara BowEdit

Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress who rose to stardom in silent film during the 1920s. Her appearance as a plucky shopgirl in the film It brought her global fame and the nickname "The It Girl". Bow came to personify the Roaring Twenties and is described as its leading sex symbol.[5]

Appearances
Daisy: "How do I look?"
Andy: "Like Clara Bow"
2015 Christmas Special
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Emily BrontëEdit

Emily Jane Brontë (30 July 1818 – 19 December 1848) was an English novelist and poet, best remembered for her only novel, Wuthering Heights, now considered a classic of English literature. She was born in the village of Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, in Northern England, to Maria Branwell and an Irish father Patrick Brontë. She was the fifth of six children, of which the two oldest, Maria and Elizabeth, died in childhood. Her other two sisters, Charlotte and Anne, became writers in their own right.[6]

Appearances
Rose: "We're taking my Russians to Haworth to see where the Brontës lived."
Cora: "What will they make of the Brontës?"
Isobel: "Oh good things surely. Hopeless lovers wandering over a desolate moor. If it wasn't Emily Brontë, it could be Tolstoy or Gogol."
Episode 5.03
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Lord ByronEdit

George Gordon Byron 6th Baron Byron, later George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), commonly known simply as Lord Byron, was an English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement. Among Byron's best-known works are the lengthy narrative poems Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and the short lyric "She Walks in Beauty." He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets and remains widely read and influential.

He traveled to fight against the Ottoman Empire in the Greek War of Independence, for which Greeks revere him as a national hero. He died at age 36 from a fever contracted while in Missolonghi in Greece.[7]

Appearances

Violet: "It's too good, the one thing we don't want is a poet in the family."
Isobel: "Would it be so bad?"
Violet: "The only poet peer I am familiar with is Lord Byron, and I presume we all know how that ended?"
— Episode 4.05
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Ivy CloseEdit

Ivy Close (15 June 1890 – 4 December 1968) was a British actress. She acted in 44 films between 1912 and 1929. Her first husband was photographer and filmmaker Elwin Neame (1885-1923). Together they established Ivy Close Films in 1914, one of the first movie production companies founded by a film star.[8]

Appearances

Alfred: "How about Ivy Close in The Ware Case? She made Lillian Gish look like a school marm."
Ivy: "Ivy Close, it's funny thinking of a film star having your own name."
— Episode 3.07
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Phyllis DareEdit

Phyllis Dare (15 August 1890 – 27 April 1975) born Phyllis Constance Haddie Dones in Chelsea, London, was an English singer and actress, famous for her performances in Edwardian musical comedy and other musical theatre in the first half of the 20th century.[9]

Appearances

James: "I say, Phyllis Dare is going to the Theatre Royal in York. Miss Dare will appear in The Lady of the Rose, the hit musical of the London season."
Ivy: "Who is Phyllis Dare?"
James: "Only one of the Dare sisters"
— Episode 4.02
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della FrancescaEdit

Piero della Francesca (c. 1415 – 12 October 1492) was a painter of the Early Renaissance. As testified by Giorgio Vasari in his Lives of the Artists, to contemporaries he was also known as a mathematician and geometer. Nowadays Piero della Francesca is chiefly appreciated for his art. His painting was characterized by its serene humanism, its use of geometric forms and perspective. His most famous work is the cycle of frescoes The Legend of the True Cross in the church of San Francesco in the Tuscan town of Arezzo.[10]

Appearances
Mention
Kemal Pamuk: "Is this picture really a Della Francesca?"
Mary: "I think so. The second earl brought back several paintings from--"
Episode 1.03
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DiaghilevEdit

Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (31 March 1872 – 19 August 1929), usually referred to outside Russia as Serge, was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes, from which many famous dancers and choreographers would arise. Diaghilev was known as a hard, demanding, even frightening taskmaster[11].

Appearances
Andy: "Is that straight?"
Baxter: "Down and a bit to the left."
Bates: "We're not striving for ??? Diaghilev, the point is we have made an effort."
Episode 6.04
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Charles DickensEdit

Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's most memorable fictional characters and is generally regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. During his life, his works enjoyed unprecedented fame, and by the twentieth century his literary genius was broadly acknowledged by critics and scholars. His novels and short stories continue to be widely popular.[12]

Appearances

Mrs. Hughes: "Mr. Carson, he is in the workhouse. And if you were wondering, it is as bad as if it were in a novel by Dickens."
Mr. Carson: "Haven't they closed the workhouses"
Mrs. Hughes: "No they haven't. Not all of them."
— Episode 4.01
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Douglas FairbanksEdit

Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director, and producer. He was best known for his swashbuckling roles in silent films such as The Thief of Bagdad, Robin Hood, and The Mark of Zorro but spent the early part of his career making comedies.

An astute businessman, Fairbanks was a founding member of United Artists. Fairbanks was also a founding member of The Motion Picture Academy and hosted the first Oscars Ceremony in 1929. With his marriage to Mary Pickford in 1920s, the couple became Hollywood royalty and Fairbanks was referred to as "The King of Hollywood", a nickname later passed on to actor Clark Gable. His career rapidly declined however with the advent of the "talkies". His final film was The Private Life of Don Juan (1934).[13]

Appearances
Mary: "You're not being fair. I am not some overheated housemaid drooling over a photograph of Douglas Fairbanks."
Charles Blake: "Plantagenets are as susceptible as housemaids when it comes to sex."
Episode 5.02
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Lillian GishEdit

Lillian Diana Gish (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993) was an American stage, screen and television actress, director and writer whose film acting career spanned 75 years, from 1912 to 1987. Gish was called The First Lady of American Cinema. [14]

Appearances

Alfred: "Lillian Gish is in it."
Ivy: "I like her."
— Episode 3.07
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Elinor GlynEdit

Elinor Glyn née Sutherland (b. 17 October 1864 – d. 23 September 1943), was a British novelist and scriptwriter who specialised in romantic fiction which was considered scandalous for its time. She popularized the concept of it. Although her works are relatively tame by modern standards, she had tremendous influence on early 20th century popular culture and perhaps on the careers of notable Hollywood stars such as Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson and Clara Bow in particular.[15]

Appearances
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Lady GregoryEdit

Isabella Augusta, Lady Gregory (15 March 1852 – 22 May 1932), born Isabella Augusta Persse, was an Irish dramatist, folklorist and theatre manager. With William Butler Yeats and Edward Martyn, she co-founded the Irish Literary Theatre and the Abbey Theatre, and wrote numerous short works for both companies. Lady Gregory produced a number of books of retellings of stories taken from Irish mythology. Born into a class that identified closely with British rule, her conversion to cultural nationalism, as evidenced by her writings, was emblematic of many of the political struggles to occur in Ireland during her lifetime.[16]

Appearances

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Rider HaggardEdit

Sir Henry Rider Haggard (22 June 1856 – 14 May 1925) known as H. Rider Haggard — was an English writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa, and a pioneer of the Lost World literary genre. He was also involved in agricultural reform throughout the British Empire. His stories, situated at the lighter end of Victorian literature, continue to be popular and influential.[17]

Appearances
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Nathaniel HawthorneEdit

Nathaniel Hawthorne born Nathaniel Hathorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was an American novelist and short story writer.

Much of Hawthorne's writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral allegories with a Puritan inspiration. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, Dark romanticism. His themes often center on the inherent evil and sin of humanity, and his works often have moral messages and deep psychological complexity. His published works include novels, short stories, and a biography of his friend Franklin Pierce.[18]

Appearances

Violet: "What is The Scarlet Letter?"
Edith: "A novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne."
— Episode 3.07
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Edmond HoyleEdit

Edmond Hoyle (1672 - August 29, 1769) was an English writer known for his books on rules and play for card games. The phrase "according to Hoyle" came about in reference to his perceived-authority on the subject of card games.

Appearances

Harold: "Did this fellow Gregson give you a difficult time of it?"
Sampson: "To be perfectly honest I wasn't sure he was playing strictly according to Hoyle but, we'll leave it since the poor chap's missing."
— 2013 Christmas Special
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Dr. JohnsonEdit

Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 [O.S. 7 September] – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as "arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history". He is also the subject of "the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature": James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson.[19]

Appearances

Mrs. Hughes: "Perhaps people are tired of...style and show."
Mr. Carson: "Well, in my opinion, to misquote Dr Johnson, “if you’re tired of style, you are tired of life.”"
— Episode 3.02
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Al JolsonEdit

Al Jolson born Asa Yoelson (May 26, 1886 – October 23, 1950) was an American singer, film actor, and comedian. At the peak of his career, he was dubbed "The World's Greatest Entertainer".

His performing style was brash and extroverted, and he popularized a large number of songs that benefited from his "shamelessly sentimental, melodramatic approach".[20]

Appearances

Rose: "I love Al Jolson. Don't you? I have all his records."
John Bullock: "Including April Showers?"
Rose: "Of course. I love it madly."
— Episode 4.03
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Karl MarxEdit

Karl Heinrich Marx (5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, sociologist, historian, journalist, and revolutionary socialist. Marx's work in economics laid the basis for the current understanding of labour and its relation to capital, and has influenced much of subsequent economic thought. He published numerous books during his lifetime, the most notable being The Communist Manifesto (1848) and Das Kapital (1867–1894).[21]

Appearances

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Tom MixEdit

Thomas Edwin "Tom" Mix (born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940) was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies. Between 1909 and 1935, Mix appeared in 291 films, all but nine of which were silent movies. He was Hollywood's first Western megastar and is noted as having helped define the genre for all cowboy actors who followed.[22]

Appearances

Thomas: "Don’t tell me what I mean, Miss O’Brien. I’m warning you."
O'Brien: "Listen to yourself. You sound like Tom Mix in a Wild West picture show. Stop warning me and go and lay out His Lordship’s pyjamas."
— Episode 3.02
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Pola NegriEdit

Pola Negri (born Barbara Apolonia Chałupec, 3 January 1897 – 1 August 1987) was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles.

She was the first European film star to be invited to Hollywood, and became one of the most popular actresses in American silent film. Her varied career included work as an actress in theatre and vaudeville; as a singer and recording artist; as an author; and as a ballerina.[23]

Appearances
Mary: "Ready or not, I am coming in."
Isobel: "Pola Negri comes to Yorkshire."
Episode 5.06
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Mabel NormandEdit

Mabel Normand was an American silent film comedienne and actress. She was a popular star of Mack Sennett's Keystone Studios and is noted as one of the film industry's first female screenwriters, producers and directors. Onscreen she co-starred in commercially successful films with Charles Chaplin and Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle more than a dozen times each, occasionally writing and directing movies featuring Chaplin as her leading man. At the height of her career in the late 1910s and early 1920s, Normand had her own movie studio and production company.[24]

Appearances

Daisy: "What you reading?"
Ethel: "Photoplay about Mable Normand. She was nothing when she started, you know. Her father was a carpenter and they'd no money, and now she's a shining film star. "
— Episode 2.01
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PucciniEdit

Giacomo Puccini (22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas are among the important operas played as standards.

Puccini has been called "the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi". While his early work was rooted in traditional late-19th-century romantic Italian opera, he successfully developed his work in the realistic verismo style, of which he became one of the leading exponents.[25]

Appearances

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RosettiEdit

Christina Rosetti (5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894) Her father was the poet Gabriele Rossetti; her brother was major Pre-Raphaelite painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Christina Rossetti is best known for her ballads, her religious lyrics, and her themes of death, salvation, and redemption. Rossetti's best-known work, Goblin Market and Other Poems, was published in 1862. The collection established Rossetti as a significant voice in Victorian poetry. The lines quoted in Episode 4.03 are from her poem, Remember (1862): Better by far you should forget and smileThan that you should remember and be sad.[26]

Appearances

Violet: "Better by far that you should forget his smile, than to remember and be sad."
Isobel: "But Rosetti was writing about her own death, not her child's."
— Episode 4.03
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RuskinEdit

John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, also an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He wrote on subjects ranging from geology to architecture, myth to ornithology, literature to education, and botany to political economy. His writing styles and literary forms were equally varied. Ruskin penned essays and treatises, poetry and lectures, travel guides and manuals, letters and even a fairy tale. The elaborate style that characterised his earliest writing on art was later superseded by a preference for plainer language designed to communicate his ideas more effectively. In all of his writing, he emphasised the connections between nature, art and society. He also made detailed sketches and paintings of rocks, plants, birds, landscapes, and architectural structures and ornamentation.[27]

Appearances

Robert: "If it had been left to that bloody fool, Branson. You should see what he reads. It's all Marx and Ruskin and John Stuart Mill. I ask you. "
Mary: "Papa prefers the servants to read the bible and letters from home."
— Episode 1.06
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ShakespeareEdit

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[28]

Appearances

Daisy: "I don't know what to say."
Mrs. Patmore: "It doesn't matter. He's dying. Just say nice, warm, comforting things. Make him feel loved. You don't have to be Shakespeare."
— Episode 2.05
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Marie StopesEdit

Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes (15 October 1880 – 2 October 1958) was a British author, palaeobotanist, academic, eugenicist, campaigner for women's rights, and pioneer in the field of birth control. Her contributions to plant palaeontology and coal classification were significant, and she was the first female academic on the faculty of the University of Manchester. With her second husband Humphrey Verdon Roe she founded the first birth control clinic in Britain. Stopes edited the newsletter Birth Control News which gave explicit practical advice. Her sex manual Married Love was controversial and influential: it brought the subject of birth control into wide public discourse. She was never in favour of abortion, arguing that preventing conception was all that was needed.[29]

Appearances
Bates: "I looked in all the cupboards, and I found some other things."
Anna: "Oh yes."
Bates: "Yes. I found a book by Marie Stopes."
Episode 5.06
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Lytton StracheyEdit

Giles Lytton Strachey (1 March 1880 – 21 January 1932) was a British writer and critic.

A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group[30] and author of Eminent Victorians, he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which psychological insight and sympathy are combined with irreverence and wit. His biography Queen Victoria (1921) was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.[31]

Appearances
Rosamund: "How exotic. I expect to find the whole of the Bloomsbury set curled up in the corner with a book."
Edith: "Michael knew quite a few of them actually. I met Virginia Woolf in this room, and Lytton Strachey, although he didn't stay very long."
Episode 6.01
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Ellen TerryEdit

Dame Ellen Terry GBE, born Alice Ellen Terry (27 February 1847 – 21 July 1928) was an English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain. Born into a family of actors, Terry began performing as a child, acting in Shakespeare plays in London and toured throughout the British provinces as a teen.

In 1878 she joined Henry Irving's company as his leading lady, and for more than the next two decades she was considered the leading Shakespearean and comic actress in Britain. Two of her most famous roles were Portia in The Merchant of Venice and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing. She and Irving also toured with great success in America and Britain.

In 1903 Terry took over management of London's Imperial Theatre, focusing on the plays of George Bernard Shaw and Henrik Ibsen. The venture was a financial failure, and Terry turned to touring and lecturing. She continued to find acting success until 1920, while also appearing in films until 1922. Her career lasted nearly seven decades.[32]

Appearances
Violet: "What news of your suitor?"
Isobel: "I haven't heard from him lately."
Violet: "Have you decided what answer you are going to give him yet?"
Isobel: "Well I think I should tell him before I tell you. Wouldn't you agree?"
Violet: "Ellen Terry has nothing on you when it comes to stringing out a moment."
Episode 5.05
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TrollopeEdit

Anthony Trollope (24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of his best-loved works, collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, revolve around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote perceptive novels on political, social, and gender issues, and on other topical matters.[33]

Appearances
Robert: "Did you enjoy the hunt today, Mr Napier? Mary said you had a tremendous run."
Evelyn Napier: "It was like something out of a trollop novel."
Episode 1.03
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Rudolph ValentinoEdit

Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Pierre Filibert Guglielmi di Valentina d'Antonguolla professionally known as Rudolph Valentino (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926), was an Italian actor who starred in several well-known silent films including The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, The Sheik, Blood and Sand, The Eagle, and The Son of the Sheik. An early pop icon, a sex symbol of the 1920s, he was known as the "Latin Lover" or simply as "Valentino". He had applied for American citizenship shortly before his death, which occurred at age 31, causing mass hysteria among his female fans and further propelling him into icon status.[34]

Appearances

Mrs. Patmore: "What are you going to see?"
James: "The Sheik"
Mrs. Patmore: "Ooh, I like that Rudolph Valentino."
— Episode 4.06
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Jules VerneEdit

Jules Verne (8 February 1828 – 24 March 1905) was a French novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his adventure novels and his profound influence on the literary genre of science fiction.[35]

Appearances

O'Brien: "You'll have to find some work."
Thomas: "It's not that easy. Every Tom, Dick, and Harry's looking for work these days and they don't all have a hand like a Jules Verne experiment."
— Episode 2.08
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H. G. WellsEdit

Herbert George "H. G." Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) was an English writer, now best known for his work in the science fiction genre. He was also a prolific writer in many other genres, including contemporary novels, history, politics and social commentary, even writing textbooks and rules for war games. Wells is sometimes called "The Father of Science Fiction", as are Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback. His most notable science fiction works include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau.[36]

Appearances

Matthew: "It seems very wise to get a telephone now. If there is a war, it may be very hard to have one installed in a private house."
Robert: "Well, let me show you where we're going to put it."
Violet: "First electricity, now telephones. Sometimes I feel as if I were living in an H.G. Wells novel. But the young are all so calm about change, aren't they? Look at Matthew. I do admire him."
— Episode 1.07
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Oscar WildeEdit

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish writer and poet. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, his only novel (The Picture of Dorian Gray), his plays, and the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death.[37]

Appearances

O'Brien: "Well I am surprised you are a fan of Mr. Oscar Wilde"
Bates: "You have known about Mr. Barrow all along. So what has changed now?"
— Episode 3.08
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Sarah WilsonEdit

Sarah Wilson (1865 – 22 October 1929), born Lady Sarah Isabella Augusta Spencer-Churchill, became the first woman war correspondent in 1899, when she was recruited by Alfred Harmsworth to cover the Siege of Mafeking for the Daily Mail during the Boer War. She was the youngest daughter of John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough.[38]

Appearances

Violet: "What do you mean you wrote to a newspaper? No lady writes to a newspaper."
Edith: "What about Lady Sarah Wilson? She’s the daughter of a duke and she worked as a war journalist."
Violet: "Well, she’s a Churchill. The Churchills are different."
— Episode 3.04
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References

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